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Military History: Most Popular Articles

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Nightmare Camp: Andersonville Prison
Andersonville Prison was the most notorious prisoner of war camp of the Civil War. Constructed in southern Georgia, the 26.5 acre, open stockade received over 45,000 prisoners during its year of operation. Plagued by disease and starvation, 12,913 Union prisoners died at Andersonville.
What Caused the Civil War?
The American Civil War was the result of a variety of causes ranging from slavery and states rights to industrialization and societal change. These causes touched off secession and hostilities.
A Guide to the Falklands War
An overview of the 1982 Falklands War between Great Britain and Argentina. The Falklands War occurred after Argentine forces occupied the Falklands Islands in April 1982. Shortly thereafter a British naval task force succeeded in recapturing the Falklands and forcing the Argentine troops there to surrender.
What Caused the Vietnam War?
The Vietnam War had its roots in French colonialism and World War II. Rebeling against French authority, Vietnamese forces were able to drive them from the country in 1954. Divided by the Geneva Accords, Vietnam was split north and south, with the United States supporting the democratic South Vietnam.
Road to Conflict: The Causes of World War II
The causes of World War II in Europe can be traced to the Treaty of Versailles which ended World War I. As a result of economic hardship imposed by the treaty, as well as the Great Depression, Germany embraced the fascist Nazi Party. Led by Adolf Hitler, the Nazis took control of the country and began a program of expansion that culminated with the invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939 and caused World War II to begin.
World War II 101: A Brief History
The bloodiest conflict in history, World War II consumed the globe from 1939-1945. World War II was fought largely in Europe, the Pacific, and eastern Asia, and pitted the Axis powers of Germany, Italy, and Japan against the Allied nations of Great Britain, France, China, the United States, and Soviet Union. While the Axis enjoyed early success, they were gradually beaten back, with both Italy and Germany falling to Allied troops and Japan surrendering after the use of the atomic bomb.
A Short Introduction to the Vietnam War
Start here for information about the Vietnam War - a short, one page overview of the conflict.
End of an Era: The Fall of Constantinople
The Fall of Constantinople took place in 1453 after the Ottomans successfully laid siege to the city. The loss of Constantinople marked the end of the Byzantine Empire. The siege of Constantinople was conducted by Mehmet II and lasted nearly two months.
German Raider: Scharnhorst
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The Globe Afire: The Battles of World War II
World War II saw some of the bloodiest battles ever fought. Beginning in 1939 with the German attack on Poland, the battles of the World War I ranged across the world from the France to Russia to the Pacific. These massive battles made famous places such as Stalingrad, Midway, the Bulge, and Iwo Jima.
The Battle of Fort McHenry and the Birth of the...
The Battle of Fort McHenry was fought September 13/14, 1814, during the British attack on Baltimore. While British troops were checked at North Point on September 12, VAdm. Alexander Cochrane's fleet attacked Fort McHenry with the goal of taking the city. Enduring a 25-hour bombardment, Fort McHenry held and the British were forced to withdraw.
The Korean War: An Overview
The Korean War was fought between 1950 and 1953 between South Korea and United Nations forces and North Korea and China. The Korean War began when North Korea invaded its neighbor in June 1950. Over the next three years, the Korean War saw both sides fight up and down the peninsula until an armistice took effect in July 1953.
Persian Wars: Battle of Thermopylae
The Battle of Artemisium was fought in early August 480 BC in conjunction with the Battle of Thermopylae. The Battle of Artemisium was a naval engagement between the Greek and Persian fleets and saw fighting over a three day span. With the defeat on land at Thermopylae, the Greeks were forced to withdraw from Artemisium.
The Frozen Chosin: Battle of Chosin Reservoir
The Battle of Chosin Reservoir was fought during the Korean War after Chinese forces entered the conflict. Occurring between November 26 and December 13, 1950, the Battle of Chosin Reservoir saw badly outnumbered United Nations forces fight their way through Chinese lines to reach the port of Hungnam. During the campaign, UN troops endured extreme cold and hardship before successfully escaping.
The Paris Peace Accords and the Last Days of...
With the signing of the Paris Peace Accords in January 1973, the United States ended its direct involvement in the Vietnam War. In 1974, North Vietnam began offensive operations against South Vietnam. The Vietnam War ended in 1975 with the fall of Saigon.
Battle of Midway: Turning Point in the Pacific
The Battle of Midway in early June 1942, marked the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Fighting to the west of Midway, the US Navy attacked and sunk four Japanese aircraft carriers while losing only one of its own.
World War II: German Panther Tank
The Panther medium tank entered service with the Wehrmacht in mid-1943. Possessing an excellent blend of firepower, armor, and speed, the Panther was one of the finest tanks produced during World War II. Used until the end of the conflict, the Panther strongly influenced postwar tank designs.
The Battle of Okinawa: How the US Advanced to...
The Battle of Okinawa was fought April 1 to June 22, 1945, during World War II. Landing on Okinawa, Allied forces met fierce resistance from the Japanese defenders. Lasting nearly three months, the Battle of Okinawa ended with Allied troops capturing the island.
Vietnam War 101: A Brief Overview
The Vietnam War traces its roots back to the country's division after the defeat of French colonial rule. American involvement in the Vietnam War began in 1965 following the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. In 1973, US forces left Southeast Asia ending their participation and two years later Saigon fell to North Vietnamese forces ending the Vietnam War.
World War II: M26 Pershing
The M26 Pershing tank was developed during World War II for the US Army. Entering service in 1945, small numbers of M26 Pershings saw combat in Europe. The M26 Pershing was retained after the conflict and later saw battle during the Korean War.
World War II: Sturmgewehr 44 (StG44)
The Sturmgewehr 44 was the first assault rifle to see deployment on a large scale. Developed by Nazi Germany, the Sturmgewehr 44 was introduced in 1943, and first saw service on the Eastern Front. Though far from perfect, the StG44 proved a versatile weapon for German forces.
Schwalbe: Messerschmitt Me 262
The Messerschmitt Me 262 was the world's first operational jet fighter. A groundbreaking aircraft, the Me 262 entered service in 1944. Though faster than Allied fighters, the Me 262 was not as maneuverable and never appeared in large enough numbers to have an impact on the war.
World War I 101: A Brief Overview of World War I
World War I commenced in August 1914 after a series of events sparked by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. World War I was the largest conflict in history to date, killed over 15 million people, and devastated large parts of Europe before its end in November 1918.
A Gallant Defense: The Battle of Wake Island
The Battle of Wake Island was fought December 8-23, 1941 and saw the US Marines mount a heroic defense before being overwhelemed by Japanese forces. First landing on Wake Island on December 11, the Japanese were repulsed by the Marines. Reinforced, they returned on the 23rd and succeeded in taking Wake Island.
A Guide to the American Civil War
The Civil War was fought between 1861 and 1865, and was the bloodiest conflict in American history. Pitting North against South, the Civil War had lasting repucussions that are still felt today. This overview will provide a brief history of the Civil War.
First Blood in Vietnam: Battle of Ia Drang
The Battle of Ia Drang was fought November 14-18, 1965, during the Vietnam War. The first major battle to involve American troops, Ia Drang saw air mobile US forces land in the Central Highlands. During the course of the fight, they endured heavy fighting before winning a tactical victory.
Final Victory: The Battle of Yorktown
The Battle of Yorktown was fought between September 28 and October 19, 1781, after Gen. George Washington slipped away from New York and besieged Gen. Charles Cornwallis' army at Yorktown, VA. Supported by the French, Washington was able to compel the British to surrender after a brief siege. The Battle of Yorktown was the last major engagement of the American Revolution.
Top Five Admirals of World War II
World War II saw the rise of great admirals in each of the combatant nations. Here we profile five of the best admirals to command fleets during the conflict.
Evacuation of Dunkirk: Miracle on the Channel
Fighting the Battle of Dunkirk, the British Expeditionary Force struggled to hold off the German advance in order to allow Allied forces to evacuate to England. Forming a defensive perimeter around Dunkirk, British forces held out long enough to allow a wide variety of vessels to rescue over 330,000 men. Though a defeat, the success of the Dunkirk evacuation allowed Britain to continue the war.
Historical Figures of the American Revolution:...
General Sir William Howe was a key British commander during the American Revolution. Howe led took command of British forces in American in 1775 and conducted successful campaigns against New York and Philadelphia. Howe resigned in 1778 and returned to Britain.
Battle of the Bulge: Germany's Last Major...
The Battle of the Bulge was the result of a massive offensive launched by the Germans on December 16, 1944. A desperate attempt to defeat the Allies in the West, the Battle of the Bulge saw the Germans mass their remaining strength in an attempt to capture Antwerp. After initial success, the German offensive was stopped and defeated by Allied troops.
Architect of Pearl Harbor: Admiral Isoroku...
Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto was the genius behind Japan's early naval successes during World War II. After the attack at Pearl Harbor, Yamamoto was finally defeated at the Battle of Midway. On April 18, 1943, Yamamoto was killed when his plane was intercepted by American fighters near Bougainville.
Bending Neutrality: The Lend-Lease Act
The Lend-Lease Act of 1941 was legislation that allowed the neutral United States to provide direct military aid to the Allies. The Lend-Lease act allowed the US to loan, lease, defense equipment for the duration of the war. Used extensively, it provided all typs of equipment from frontline weapons to vast numbers of trucks and railroad stock.
The Victor of Tours: Charles Martel
Charles Martel was the leader of the Frankish army at the Battle of Tours in 732, and played a key role in turning back the Muslim invasions of Europe. Charles Martel also founded the Carolingian Empire which was later ruled by his grandson, Charlemagne.
Bloody Tarawa
The Battle of Tarawa was fought November 20-23, 1943, during World War II. Advancing into the Gilbert Islands, the Battle of Tarawa saw American forces endure a bloody struggle for the island. In the battle, almost the entire Japanese garrison of Tarawa was killed.
A Bloody Sideshow: The Battle of Gallipoli
The Battle of Gallipoli began when British Commonwealth and French troops landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula of Turkey adjacent to the Dardanelles. In a brutal campaign, Allied forces were unable to dislodge the Turks from Gallipoli's heights. After nearly a year of fighting they ended the fight and withdrew.
Military History Timeline
Gain a quick overview of military history with this timeline that traces battles and wars through the ages.
Manhattan Project: Little Boy
Little Boy was the first atomic bomb used against Japan in World War II, detonated over Hiroshima on August 6, 1945.
Vietnam War: Battle of Hamburger Hill
In May 1969, US forces moved into the A Shau Valley in South Vietnam opening the Battle of Hamburger Hill. Enduring close quarters jungle fighting and several friendly fire incidents, they were finally able to overcome the North Vietnamese resistance. Due to the severity of the fighting, Hill 937 became known as
World War II: Consolidated B-24 Liberator
The Consolidated B-24 Liberator was one of the principal heavy bombers used by the US Army Air Force during World War II. First flying in late 1939, the B-24 Liberator saw extensive service during the war and was also used for maritime patrols. One of the B-24's most famous raids occured in 1943, when the aircraft struck the oil fields near Ploesti.
A Bridge Too Far: Operation Market-Garden
Operation Market-Garden was conducted September 17-25, 1944, in an attempt to capture bridges over the Rhine. Market-Garden was devised by Bernard Montgomery and called for Allied airborne forces to be dropped near bridges in the Netherlands in conjunction with a ground offensive. While the first two sets of bridges were taken, the Germans held the third and Market-Garden failed.
The Big E: USS Enterprise (CV-6)
USS Enterprise (CV-6) was an American aircraft carrier during World War II. Entering service in 1938, USS Enterprise saw action throughout the war in the Pacific including the Battle of Midway. One of the most honored ships of the war, USS Enterprise earned 20 battle stars and the Presidential Unit Citation.
Guide to the American Revolution
The American Revolution was fought between 1775 and 1783, and was the result of increasing colonial unhappiness with British rule. During the American Revolution, American forces were constantly hampered by a lack of resources, but managed to win critical victories which led to an alliance with France. Following the American victory at Yorktown, fighting effectively ended and the war was concluded with the Treaty of Paris in 1783.
Island Hopping in World War II: A Path to...
During World War II, the Allies adopted a strategy of island hopping to move across the Pacific and defeat Japan.
Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points: A Path to Peace
The Fourteen Points were developed during World War I by President Woodrow Wilson. Wilson hoped the terms of his Fourteen Points, which stressed progressive ideas like self-determination and free trade, could serve as the basis for a peace agreement. The Fourteen Points were discussed and partially incorporated into the Treaty of Versailles.
The Longest Day: D-Day - The Invasion of Normandy
D-Day refers to the Invasion of Normandy which took place on June 6, 1944, during World War II. Landing on D-Day, Allied forces were preceded by airborne troops which dropped during the night. On D-Day, Allied forces gained a foothold in France from which they would advance to defeat Germany.
The Jug: Republic P-47 Thunderbolt
The P-47 Thunderbolt was a key Allied fighter and fighter-bomber during World War II. The P-47 Thunderbolt entered service in 1942, and the fighter saw service in both Europe and the Pacific. Nicknamed
Everything You Need to Know About the War of 1812
The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and Great Britain. Beginning in June 1812, the War of 1812 was the result of American anger over trade issues, impressment of sailors, and British support of Indian attacks on the frontier. Lasting two and half years, the War of 1812 saw American forces attempt to invade Canada while the British attacked American territory. Ended in early 1815, the war resulted in a return to status quo ante bellum.
Wars of the Second Triumvirate: Battle of...
Learn the history behind the Battle of Philippi, instigated by the assassination of Julius Caesar and fought on two separate dates, October 3 and 23, 42 BC.
Roman Empire: Battle of the Teutoburg Forest
The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest was fought in September 9 AD in present-day Germany. En route to winter quarters, three Roman legions sought to defeat a rebellion led by Arminius. Attacked in the Teutoburg Forest by the Germanic tribes, the Romans were effectively destroyed.
A World War II Icon: M4 Sherman Tank
The iconic American tank of World War II, the M4 Sherman was produced in large numbers and served in all theaters. The M4 Sherman tank was a reliable, easily produced medium tank that provided invaluable service in supporting American troops. The M4 Sherman tank saw service with many nations during and after the war.
The Munich Agreement: How Appeasement Failed to...
The Munich Agreement was concluded on September 30, 1938, and saw the powers of Europe give in to Nazi Germany's demands for the Sudetenland. Meeting in Munich, British and French leaders elected to effectively cede part of Czechoslovakia rather than risk war. The Munich Agreement was part of a policy of appeasement which led Europe down the path to World War II.
Monty: Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery
Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery was a noted British commander during World War II. Taking command of Eighth Army in 1942, he won a critical victory at El Alamein before successfully leading it across North Africa, then across to Sicily and Italy. Commanding Allied forces in Western Europe, Montgomery masterminded Operation Market-Garden and fought until the end of the war.
Weapons of World War II: The M1 Garand
The M1 Garand was the first semiautomatic rifle to be issued to an entire army. Developed in the 1920s and 1930s, the M1 was designed by John Garand. Firing a .30-06 round, the M1 Garand was the main infantry weapon employed by US forces during World War II and the Korean War.
Vietnam War: Battle of Khe Sanh
The Battle of Khe Sanh was fought during the first four months of 1968. Besieged during the Tet Offensive, the Marine base at Khe Sanh held out against heavy attacks by the North Vietnamese with the support of American air power. In April, Operation Pegasus was launched which ultimately relieved the garrison.
American Revolution: Major General Charles Lee
Major General Charles Lee was an officer during the American Revolution. A veteran of the Seven Years' War and British Army, Charles Lee joined the Continental Army in 1775. Captured in 1776, Charles Lee was later exchanged and saw action at the Battle of Monmouth two years later. Performing poorly, Charles Lee was relieved during the battle.
Gallic Wars: Battle of Alesia
The Battle of Alesia took place in the fall of 52 BC as Julius Caesar laid siege to the Mandubii settlement at Alesia in Gaul. Building an extensive set of fortifications around Alesia, Caesar beat off attacks from Vercingetorix's garrison as well as a relief army. The victory at Alesia effectively secured Gaul for Rome.
Leyte Gulf: The Largest Naval Battle of World...
The Battle of Leyte Gulf was a series engagements fought October 23-26, 1944, in the waters around the Philippines. During the fighting, the Japanese attempted to block the Allied invasion of Leyte through a series of naval battles. The Battle of Leyte Gulf ended in a massive Allied victory and effectively crippled the Imperial Japanese Navy.
Victor of Plassey: Major General Robert Clive
A noted commander and leader in the East India Company during the 18th century. Arriving in India in the 1740s, Clive helped establish British supremacy.
World War II/Korean War: Lieutenant General...
Chesty Puller was noted US Marine who saw service during World War II and the Korean War. During his career, Chesty Puller became one of the most decorated Marines in history. Seeing action at notable engagements such as Guadalcanal and Chosin Reservoir, Chesty Puller later retired as a lieutenant colonel.
World War II: Tiger Tank
The Tiger I was a famous tank produced by Germany during World War II. The Tiger was the first to mount the heavy 88mm gun. Used on all fronts by the Wehrmacht, the Tiger was a dangerous opponent, but complex and mechanically unreliable.
Vietnam War: Raid on Son Tay
The Raid on Son Tay was an attempt by US Special Forces to liberate American prisoners of war during the Vietnam War. Flying from Thailand, the raiders successfully captured the POW camp at Son Tay, however all of the prisoners had been moved to a different camp a few months earlier. Though no one was liberated, the mission was deemed a
Crossing the Rhine: The Bridge at Remagen
The Bridge at Remagen was the first Allied bridgehead over the Rhine River in the closing days of World War II.
World War I/II: Lee-Enfield Rifle
The Lee-Enfield rifle was the standard service rifle of British and Commonwealth forces for much of the first half of the 20th century. A bolt-action, magazine-fed weapon, the Lee-Enfield saw extensive service during World War I and II. It is the second-most produced military rifle of all-time.
Brother vs. Brother: Battles of the Civil War
The Civil War saw the largest battles ever fought in the Western Hemisphere. Beginning with the attack on Fort Sumter, the battles of the Civil War ranged across the country from the East Coast to the Mississippi River. These massive battles made famous places such as Antietam, Gettysburg, Chickamauga, and Peterburg.
Crusader King: The Military Exploits of Richard...
King Richard I the Lionheart was crowned King of England September 3, 1189. A gifted military leader, Richard the Lionheart is best known for his role in the Third Crusade against Saladin. Richard was killed on April 6, 1199, while besieging Chalus-Chabrol castle in France.
World War II: Boeing B-29 Superfortress
One of the largest aircraft to see service during World War II, the Boeing B-29 Superfortress was the last major addition to the US bomber fleet during the conflict. Easily recognized by its distinctive silhouette, the B-29 is best known as the aircraft that dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
The Zeke: Mitsubishi A6M Zero
The Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero was the primary fighter used by the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. Highly maneuverable, the Japanese Zero outclassed most Allied fighters during the early years of the conflict. As the war progressed, the Zero found itself inferior to the new generation of fighters such as the F6F Hellcat and F4U Corsair.
Zero Scourge: The Grumman F6F Hellcat
The Grumman F6F Hellcat entered service in 1943 as a replacement for the F4F Wildcat. Designed to combat the Japanese A6M Zero, the F6F Hellcat was a rugged fighter that proved superior to its opponents. Flying through the end of the war, the F6F Hellcat amassed an impressive service record.
Father of the Strategic Air Command: General...
General Curtis LeMay first gained fame as leading bombing raids over Germany during World War II. By the end of the conflict, LeMay was commanding the bomber offensive against Japan. Following the war, LeMay became the driving force behind the Strategic Air Command and later served as Chief of Staff of the Air Force.
Battle of Anzio: A Bloody Beachhead
The Battle of Anzio began on January 22, 1944, with Allied troops landing as part of Operation Shingle. Blocked by the Germans at Monte Cassino, Allied leaders hoped to outflank the Winter Line by landing further north at Anzio. While a beachhead was established around Anzio, it was soon contained by German forces. The Allies would not break out from Anzio until May.
Pride of the Royal Navy: Vice Admiral Lord...
Born in 1758, Horatio Nelson rose to become one the world's greatest naval leaders. Horatio Nelson's victories at the Battle of the Nile, the Battle of Copenhagen, and the Battle of Trafalgar played a key role in the defeat of Revolutionary France and Napoleon. Horatio Nelson fell mortally wounded at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.
Fork-Tailed Devil: P-38 Lightning
The P-38 Lightning entered service in 1941, and saw action with American forces for much of World War II. Known for its twin tail booms and single central nacelle, the P-38 was fast and durable. With its nose-mounted armament, the P-38 was favored by American aces such as Richard Bong and Thomas MacGuire.
Texas Independence: Remember the Alamo
The Battle of Alamo was fought between Texan and Mexican forces between February 23 and March 6, 1836. Fighting for independence, the Texans fortified the Alamo and withstood a thirteen-day siege before Mexican forces overran the mission. Noted frontiermen Jim Bowie and Davy Crockett were killed in the fighting.
What Were the Main Causes of World War II in...
The causes of World War II in the Pacific began following World War I when the Western Powers recognized Japan as a colonial power. In a quest for additional natural resources and to ease population pressure, Japan invaded Manchuria in 1931 and China in 1937. These conflicts were condemned by the West, and pressure was exerted on the Japanese government to withdrawal. Rather than bow to the West, Japan launched attacked Western colonies causing World War II in the Pacific. Page 2.
Burning My Tho Viet Cong Base
The Vietnam War saw American and North Vietnamese forces clash for nearly a decade. This gallery includes a variety of images from the conflict in Vietnam from the troops on the ground to the war in the air. This photoh shows the burning of the My Tho Viet Cong base in 1968. Page 12.
World War II: Battle of Monte Cassino
The Battle of Monte Cassino was fought January 17 to May 18, 1944, during World War II. Part of the Italian Campaign, the Battle of Monte Cassino saw German forces initially halt the Allied advance up the peninsula. After four engagements, which included the controversial destruction of Monte Cassino Abbey, the Allies succeeded in breaking through and opened the way for the capture of Rome.
Napoleonic Wars: Battle of Salamanca
The Battle of Salamanca occurred on July 22, 1812, when troops under the Earl of Wellington attacked a French army led by Marshal Auguste Marmont. Fought south of Salamanca, the battle saw Wellington conduct a series of successful assaults on the enemy. Winning a stunning victory, Wellington was able to advance on Madrid.
World War II: The Liberty Ship Program
Liberty Ships were mass-produced cargo ships built during World War II to provide the Allies with much needed merchant tonnage. Designed to replace merchant ships lost to U-boat attacks, Liberty Ships were of a simple design that could be build quickly. Utilizing a variety of new and old technologies, Liberty Ships proved vital to the Allied war effort.
Muslim Invasions: Battle of Tours
The Christian triumph at this battle between the Carolingian Franks and the forces of the Umayyad Caliphat, stemmed Muslim expansion into Western Europe.
The Dominoes Fall: Causes of World War I
The causes of World War I can be traced to several factors which had been simmering for a number of decades. Among these causes of World War I were rising tensions over imperialism, increased nationalism, and a major naval arms race. These causes were brought to a head by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria which set in motion the series of events that led to World War I.
The Battle of Iwo Jima: A Costly Victory
The Battle of Iwo Jima was fought from February 19 to March 26, 1945 during World War II. Attacking Iwo Jima, US forces encountered heavy resistance after landing. Fighting on Iwo Jima was heavy until Japanese forces were finally defeated.
World War II: The Great Escape
The Great Escape took place March 24/5, 1944, and saw 76 Allied POWs escape from Stalag Luft III in Poland. Building a series of tunnels, POWs were able to create a passage under the camp's fence. Of the 76 who were part of the Great Escape only 3 reached freedom.
World War II: Battleship Yamato
The Japanese battleship Yamato, and its sisters, were the largest, most powerful ships of their type ever constructed. Completed in late 1941, Yamato served with the Imperial Japanese Navy throughout World War II. In April 1945, Yamato was sunk by US aircraft while on a
Cold War: AK-47 Assault Rifle
The most-produced assault rifle ever made was developed for the Soviet Union. Designed by Mikhail Kalashnikov, it entered service in 1949.
World War II: Battle of Singapore
The Battle of Singapore was fought in early 1942 during World War II. The Battle of Singapore saw a smaller Japanese force force the surrender of Britain's strongest outpost in the Far East. Defeated at Singapore, the British lost over 100,000 men.
The Hero of Two Worlds: Marquis de Lafayette
The Marquis de Lafayette was a French noble who served in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. Arriving in 1777, Lafayette became one of Gen. George Washington's most trusted subordinates. Returning home, he played a prominent role in the early phases of the French Revolution.
World War II: First Lieutenant Audie Murphy
Audie Murphy was the most decorated America soldier of World War II. Achieving the rank of first lieutenant, Audie Murphy received 33 decorations for his service in Europe. Audie Murphy won the Medal of Honor for his actions at Holtzwihr, France and later became a movie star.
Burying the Dead
With the battle lost, the Prince was taken from the field and the remnants of the army, led by Lord George
World War II: General George S. Patton
General George Patton was a key American commander during World War II. A gifted athlete, George Patton saw service in World War I and helped pioneer mobile warfare. An outspoken leader, Patton proved gifted corps and army commander in North Africa and Europe.
International Terrorism: The Entebbe Raid
After hijacking Air France Flight 139, the terrorists directed the plane to divert to Entebbe, Uganda where the Jews and Israelis were separated from the other passengers and kept hostage in the airport terminal. On July 4, 1976, a group of Israeli commandos landed at Entebbe and stormed the terminal, rescuing the the hostages.
MacArthur's Gamble: Landing at Inchon
A decisive early battle of the Korean War, the Inchon invasion saw UN troops storm ashore deep behind North Korean lines.
Crusader: Frederick I Barbarossa
Read the biography and military history of Frederick I Barbarossa, who reigned as Holy Roman Emperor from 1155 to 1190.
Vietnam War: The Tet Offensive
The Tet Offensive was launched in January 1968, and redefined the Vietnam War. Though defeated by US and South Vietnamese forces, the Tet Offensive changed public perceptions of the conflict.
Hundred Years' War: English Longbow
The English Longbow was devastating weapon on the medieval battlefield and was extensively used between the 13th and 17th centuries. Firing heavy arrows at long range, archers equipped with the English Longbow were capable of defeating charges by armored knights. The weapon is best remembered for its contributions to the English victories at Crecy (1346) and Agincourt (1415).
Anglo-Zanzibar War: Shortest Conflict in History
Occurring from approximately 9:00-9:45 AM on August 27, 1896, the Anglo-Zanzibar War is widely believed to be the shortest war in history. Fought between Britain and Khalid bin Barghash, the Anglo-Zanzibar conflict arose after a dispute over who would become the sultan of Zanzibar.
Making History: The Battle of the Coral Sea
The Battle of the Coral Sea was fought May 4-8, 1942, and was a strategic victory for the Allies. In the first naval battle fought entirely with aircraft, Allied naval forces were able to block a Japanese drive through the Coral Sea to Port Moresby. When the Battle of the Coral Sea ended, the Japanese had lost a light carrier while the Allies lost a heavy carrier.
World War II: Battle of Guadalcanal
The Battle of Guadalcanal was the Allies' first major offensive action of World War II in the Pacific. Landing on Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands on August 7, 1942, Allied troops began a prolonged campaign to take the island. After several battles on and around Guadalcanal, Allied forces succeeded in taking the island from the Japanese.
The Bull: Fleet Admiral William Halsey
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World War II: USS Yorktown (CV-5)
USS Yorktown (CV-5) was an American aircraft carrier during World War II. Launched in 1937, USS Yorktown took part in the Battle of the Coral Sea. USS Yorktown was lost following the Battle of Midway a month later.
Ottoman-Habsburg Wars: Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto was a key naval engagement during the Ottoman-Habsburg Wars. Meeting in the Gulf of Patras, the forces of the Holy League succeeded in defeating the Ottoman fleet and ending Turkish expansion in the Mediterranean.
Selected Bombers of World War II
The first major war to feature widespread bombing, World War II produced a variety of bombers of all shapes and sizes. While some nations such as the United States and Great Britain built long-range, four-engine aircraft, others chose to focus on smaller, medium bombers. This gallery will provide an overview of some the bombers used during the conflict.
World War II: Marshal Georgy Zhukov
Marshal Georgy Zhukov rose from peasant roots to command Soviet forces during World War II. Under his leadership, Red Army troops successfully defended Moscow and won victories at Stalingrad and Berlin. After the war, Zhukov remained a prominent figure in the Soviet military and later served as defense minister.
Mexican-American War: An Overview
The Mexican-American War resulted the dramatic growth of the United States and laid the seeds for the American Civil War. Beginning in 1846, the Mexican-American War saw American troops invade from the north and then land at Veracruz. The Mexican-American War effectively ended when US forces captured Mexico City in late 1847.
Military Terms: What Does 'Going Over the Top'...
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World War II Fighters - United States
Fighters ruled the skies during World War II. As a result, each nation strove to design the most effective and lethal aircraft to achieve air superiority. This gallery profiles several American fighters used by the US Army Air Forces and US Navy during World War II.
Graves of the Clans
At the end of May, Cumberland shifted his headquarters to Fort Augustus at the southern end of Loch Ness.
World War II: Battle of Greece
The Battle of Greece opened on April 6, 1941, when German troops attacked Allied forces in Greece. Beginning as the Greco-Italian War, the Battle of Greece initially saw Greek forces hold off the Italians. Coming to Italy's aid, Germany took over the conflict and won a swift victory. Despite triumphing in the Battle of Greece, the operation fatally delayed their invasion of the Soviet Union.
What Caused the Mexican-American War?
An overview of the roots of the conflict that resulted in the 1846-1848 war between the United States and Mexico
Star-Crossed Captain: Vice Admiral William Bligh
Vice Admiral William Bligh is best known for his role in the famed story of the mutiny on HMS Bounty. A skilled seaman, Bligh rose through the ranks of the Royal Navy and acted as sailing master for Captain James Cook on during the explorer's final voyage. Returning home, William Bligh served with distinction during the Napoleonic Wars and saw action at Copenhagen and Camperdown.
The Memorial Cairn
Erected in 1881, by Duncan Forbes, the Memorial Cairn is the largest monument on Culloden Battlefield.
Grinding Out a Victory: Battle of Caen
The Battle of Caen was fought June 6 to July 20, 1944, during World War II. Beginning on D-Day, the Battle of Caen saw British forces battle the Germans for control of the city of Caen. After extensive, bitter fighting, Caen fell as the Allies broke out of Normandy.
World War II: V-2 Rocket
The V-2 was designed by the Germans during World War II and was the world's first ballistic missile. Fired from mobile launchers, V-2 strikes hit Antwerp and London during the latter stages of the conflict. Following the war, the V-2's creators played key roles in the space race.
A Shau Valley
The Vietnam War saw American and North Vietnamese forces clash for nearly a decade. This gallery includes a variety of images from the conflict in Vietnam from the troops on the ground to the war in the air. This photo shows operations in the A Shau Valley in 1969. Page 9.
Eye in the Sky: Lockheed U-2
The Lockheed U-2 spy plane was developed in the 1950s by the Skunk Works at Lockheed. The U-2 is capable of extreme high altitude flight and has been used extensively as a surveillance aircraft as well as for research. The U-2 came to prominence when one was downed over the Soviet Union in 1960.
Caesar's Civil War: Battle of Pharsalus
The Battle of Pharsalus was the decisive engagement of Caesar's Civil War. Fought August 9, 48 BC, at Pharsalus, Greece, the battle saw Julius Caesar defeat troops under Pompey. The battle turned when some of Caesar's troops defeated a cavalry attack and were able assault the enemy in the flank and rear.
Death in the Snow: Battle of Moscow
The Battle of Moscow began on October 2, 1941 and ended on January 7, 1942. In the Battle of Moscow, German forces launched Operation Typhoon to take the city but were turned back. The Battle of Moscow concluded with a Soviet counterattack which pushed the Germans back from the city.
Ike: General Dwight D. Eisenhower
General Dwight D. Eisenhower led Allied forces in Europe during World War II. During the conflict, Dwight Eisenhower oversaw operations ranging from the landings in North Africa to D-Day and the Battle of the Bulge. Dwight Eisenhower later served as US Army Chief of Staff and was elected President of the United States in 1952.
Mighty Mo: USS Missouri (BB-63)
USS Missouri was an Iowa-class battleship that was launched during World War II. The last battleship built for the US Navy, USS Missoui saw action in the Pacific and was the site of the formal surrender of Japan. After the conflict, USS Missouri saw service in the Korean War and, after a major refit, the 1991 Gulf War.
Francis Marion: The Swamp Fox of the American...
American Revolution Brigadier General Francis Marion a.k.a.The Swamp Fox
Liberty or Death: Causes of the American...
The American Revolution was caused as a result of increasing colonial unhappiness with the policies of the British government. Following the French and Indian War, the British attempted to levy a series of taxes on the American colonies. The American Revolution was caused when colonial protests led to armed conflict.
Seven Years' War: Battle of Plassey
The Battle of Plassey was fought June 23,1757, during the Seven Years' War. Taking place in India, the Battle of Plassey saw the British East India Company square off against the French and Nawab of Bengal. A decisive victory for Robert Clive and the British, the Battle of Plassey saw them gain control of Bengal with the assistance of defectors from the Nawab's army.
The Yalta Conference: Setting the Stage for the...
The Yalta Conference was held February 4-11, 1945, and was the last wartime meeting between Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin. Meeting at the Black Sea resort of Yalta, the conference addressed many issues pertaining to the postwar world including the occupation of Germany, Soviet intervention against Japan, and the borders of Poland.
American Civil War: First Shots
The American Civil War first began when Confederate troops opened fire on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor. Following this attack, President Lincoln called for volunteer troops to put down the rebellion. The American Civil War began in earnest in July at the First Battle of Bull Run.
Clan MacKintosh at Culloden
The leaders of the Chattan Confederation, Clan MacKintosh fought in the center of the Jacobite line and
Vietnam War: Gulf of Tonkin Incident
The Gulf of Tonkin Incident occurred on August 2 and 4, 1964, and saw US naval forces engage North Vietnamese patrol boats. While the attack on August 2 happened as reported, the second attack may not have taken place. As a result of the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, President Lyndon Johnson was given as free hand in Southeast Asia by Congress.
UH-1 Huey
The Vietnam War saw American and North Vietnamese forces clash for nearly a decade. This gallery includes a variety of images from the conflict in Vietnam from the troops on the ground to the war in the air. This photo shows an American UH-1 Huey helicopter in 1971. Page 11.
Iraq War: Second Battle of Fallujah
The Second Battle of Fallujah was fought in 2004. The process of clearing the city was slowed by booby-traps and improvised explosive devices.
The Battle of Stalingrad: A Turning Point on...
The Battle of Stalingrad was a key battle on the Eastern Front during World War II. Advancing into the Soviet Union, the Germans opened the Battle of Stalingrad in July 1942. After over six months of fighting at Stalingrad, the German Sixth Army was encircled and captured. The Soviet victory at Stalingrad was a turning point on the Eastern Front.
World War II: USS Indianapolis
Commissioned in 1932, USS Indianapolis was a Portland-class heavy cruiser. Seeing action in the Pacific during World War II, USS Indianapolis participated in many of the conflicts major campaigns and was tasked with carrying the atomic bomb to Tinian in 1945. After delivering the bomb, USS Indianapolis was torpedoed and sunk with many of the crew dying of exposure and shark attacks.
George A. Custer: Life & Times
George A. Custer first achieved fame as a cavalry commander during the Civil War. A reckless soldier, Custer was known for his personal bravery and willingness to attack the enemy. Following the war, he was assigned to the frontier and took part in the US' wars against the Plains Indians. George Custer was killed in 1876, after his men were overrun at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.
Vietnam War: F-4 Phantom II
The F-4 Phantom II was originally developed for the US Navy, but also was used by the US Air Force and Marine Corps. A long-range fighter/fighter-bomber, the F-4 Phantom II saw extensive service during the Vietnam War. Replaced by the American military in the 1980s, the F-4 continued to see service with other nations.
Satsuma Rebellion: Battle of Shiroyama
The final engagement of the Satsuma Rebellion (1877) between the samurai and the Imperial Japanese Army.
War for Empire: The French & Indian/Seven...
The French and Indian War began in 1754 as the result of colonial fighting between Britian and France. By 1756 the conflict expanded into the Seven Years' War which saw fighting across Europe and around the globe. Ending in 1763, the war cost France its overseas colonies in North America.
A Desperate Defense: Battle of Bataan
The Battle of Bataan began on January 7, 1942, between Allied forces and the Japanese military, not long after the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Napoleonic Wars: Battle of Borodino
The Battle of Borodino was fought September 7, 1812, during Napoleon's invasion of Russia. Attacking Russian positions around Borodino, the French both inflicted and sustained heavy losses. Though the Russians departed after the Battle of Borodino, their army remained intact.
Vietnam: General Vo Nguyen Giap
A prominent Vietnamese general and statesman, Vo Nguyen Giap led the Viet Minh during the First Indochina War against France and masterminded the capture of Dien Bien Phu in 1954. During the Vietnam War, Vo Nguyen Giap served as commander-in-chief of the People's Army of Vietnam and planned the Tet Offensive.
Breaking Out: Operation Cobra
Operation Cobra was conducted from July 25 to 31, 1944, during World War II. Operation Cobra saw Allied forces concentrate for a breakout from the Normandy beachhead. Breaking through the German lines, Operation Cobra led to maneuver warfare in northern France and the creation of the Falaise Pocket.
American Revolution: General Thomas Gage
A veteran of the French & Indian War, General Thomas Gage commanded British forces in America during the opening days of the American Revolution. Appointed governor of Massachusetts in 1774, Gage's attempts to regain control of the colony led to the outbreak of fighting in April 1775. Later that year, Gage was recalled in favor of General William Howe.
An American Icon: General George Washington
George Washington served as commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. A veteran of the French & Indian War, George Washington achieved mixed results in the field but became a powerful symbol of American resistance to Britain. George Washington later served as the first President of the United States.
The Thud: Republic F-105 Thunderchief
The F-105 Thunderchief was one of the US Air Force's primary fighter-bombers during the Vietnam War. Widely used for strike bombing over North Vietnam, the F-105 also was employed in a
American's First Conflict: The Quasi-War
The Quasi-War was an undeclared maritime conflict between the United States and France. Fought between 1798-1800, the Quasi-War was the result of disagreements regarding the United States' neutrality during the war of the French Revolution.
Karabiner 98k: The Wehrmacht's Rifle
The Karabiner 98k was one of the principal rifles used by the German Wehrmacht (Army) during World War II. Employed in all theaters involving German forces, the Karabiner 98k was the last in a long line of Mauser rifles designed for Germany. After the war, the Karabiner 98k was used in variety of other conflicts including fighting in the Middle East and Vietnam.
Latin America: The Football War
Clashing in 1969, the Football War was the result of tensions between El Salvador and Honduras regarding immigration and land reform. Drawing its name from riots around qualifying matches for the 1970 World Cup, the Football War lasted approximately 100 hours before the Organization of American States forced a ceasefire.
Clash in Kontum: Battle of Dak To
The Battle of Dak To began as attempt by the North Vietnamese to destroy a sizable US force in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. This attack was disrupted by US forces and the three week Battle of Dak To ensued with American troops fighting to dislodge the North Vietnamese from a series of fortified hills and ridges. After heavy fighting, the Americans were able to win the Battle of Dak To and force the North Vietnamese to retreat.
World War II: Sten
The Sten was as type of British submachine gun developed and used during World War II. Entering service in 1941, the Sten gun was simple to build and maintain and was widely used by British troops and exported to other allies and resistance forces. Over 4 million Sten guns were ultimately made.
Selected Union Generals of the Civil War
The Union Army employed hundreds of generals during the Civil War. This gallery provides an overview of several of the key Union generals who contributed to the Union's cause and helped guide its armies to victory.
A Bloody Fight: The Battle of Saipan
The Battle of Saipan was fought June 15 to July 9, 1944, during World War II. Advancing to the Marianas, American forces opened the Battle of Saipan by landing on the island's west coast. In several weeks of heavy fighting, American troops won the Battle of Saipan having destroyed the Japanese garrison.
Ancient World to 1000 Military History Timeline
A military history timeline that covers the wars, battles, and events of the ancient world through 1000.
American History 101: An Brief Overview of the...
The American Civil War was fought between 1861 and 1865, and was the bloodiest conflict in American history. Pitting North against South, the American Civil War had lasting repucussions that are still felt today. This overview will provide a brief history of the American Civil War.

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